Natural languages, communication, etc

Yorkshirisms & dropping letters

A few weeks ago I was chatting with a neighbour in the park & the

various local schools came up.  I mentioned that I was under the

impression that they were all pretty good, & she said that at some of

them, "kids will come home speaking Yorkshirisms & dropping letters".

Then in her next sentence, she used "while" in the sense of "until" &

said "she were" (not subjunctively).  She didn’t drop any letters

though.

(Yes, I know: "g-dropping" (for example) is a popular but technically

incorrect term.)


Slade was the coolest band in England. They were the kind of guys

that would push your car out of a ditch.         — Alice Cooper

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posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (4)

4 Responses to “Yorkshirisms & dropping letters”

  1. admin says:

    On 2013-06-07 15:10:05 +0200, Adam Funk <a24…@ducksburg.com> said:

    > A few weeks ago I was chatting with a neighbour in the park & the

    > various local schools came up.  I mentioned that I was under the

    > impression that they were all pretty good, & she said that at some of

    > them, "kids will come home speaking Yorkshirisms & dropping letters".

    > Then in her next sentence, she used "while" in the sense of "until" &

    > said "she were" (not subjunctively).  She didn’t drop any letters

    > though.

    > (Yes, I know: "g-dropping" (for example) is a popular but technically

    > incorrect term.)

    Incorrect for "naddy", I have no doubt, but incorrect in a more general
    sense? I’m not sure: anyone not blinded by exposure to linguistics
    knows perfectly well what it means. Is one to be forbidden the use of
    everyday expressions simply because they would be frowned on if they
    appeared in a technical sense in a linguistics journal?


    athel

  2. admin says:

    On 2013-06-07, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:

    > On 2013-06-07 15:10:05 +0200, Adam Funk <a24…@ducksburg.com> said:

    >> (Yes, I know: "g-dropping" (for example) is a popular but technically

    >> incorrect term.)

    > Incorrect for "naddy", I have no doubt, but incorrect in a more general
    > sense? I’m not sure: anyone not blinded by exposure to linguistics
    > knows perfectly well what it means. Is one to be forbidden the use of
    > everyday expressions simply because they would be frowned on if they
    > appeared in a technical sense in a linguistics journal?

    If I hadn’t put that disclaimer at the end of my post, someone would

    probably have accused me of ignorantly using a bad term.  ;-)

    "H-dropping" isn’t too bad because it does actually refer to omitting

    /h/, which maps fairly well to "h" outside of digraphs.  "G-dropping"

    is wrong because it really refers to a change of vowel+consonant (or

    at least consonant) without any deletion — however, it’s good enough

    for Language Log!

    http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3193


    I have a natural revulsion to any operating system that shows so

    little planning as to have to named all of its commands after

    digestive noises (awk, grep, fsck, nroff).

                                           [The UNIX-Haters Handbook]

  3. admin says:

    Adam Funk filted:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    >On 2013-06-07, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:

    >> On 2013-06-07 15:10:05 +0200, Adam Funk <a24…@ducksburg.com> said:

    >>> (Yes, I know: "g-dropping" (for example) is a popular but technically

    >>> incorrect term.)

    >> Incorrect for "naddy", I have no doubt, but incorrect in a more general
    >> sense? I’m not sure: anyone not blinded by exposure to linguistics
    >> knows perfectly well what it means. Is one to be forbidden the use of
    >> everyday expressions simply because they would be frowned on if they
    >> appeared in a technical sense in a linguistics journal?

    >If I hadn’t put that disclaimer at the end of my post, someone would

    >probably have accused me of ignorantly using a bad term.  ;-)

    >"H-dropping" isn’t too bad because it does actually refer to omitting

    >/h/, which maps fairly well to "h" outside of digraphs.  "G-dropping"

    >is wrong because it really refers to a change of vowel+consonant (or

    >at least consonant) without any deletion — however, it’s good enough

    >for Language Log!

    How about replacing medial /t/ with /?/?…r


    Me?  Sarcastic?

    Yeah, right.

  4. admin says:

    On 7/06/13 10:22 PM, Adam Funk wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > On 2013-06-07, Athel Cornish-Bowden wrote:

    >> On 2013-06-07 15:10:05 +0200, Adam Funk <a24…@ducksburg.com> said:

    >>> (Yes, I know: "g-dropping" (for example) is a popular but technically

    >>> incorrect term.)

    >> Incorrect for "naddy", I have no doubt, but incorrect in a more general

    >> sense? I’m not sure: anyone not blinded by exposure to linguistics

    >> knows perfectly well what it means. Is one to be forbidden the use of

    >> everyday expressions simply because they would be frowned on if they

    >> appeared in a technical sense in a linguistics journal?

    > If I hadn’t put that disclaimer at the end of my post, someone would

    > probably have accused me of ignorantly using a bad term.  ;-)

    > "H-dropping" isn’t too bad because it does actually refer to omitting

    > /h/, which maps fairly well to "h" outside of digraphs.  "G-dropping"

    > is wrong because it really refers to a change of vowel+consonant (or

    > at least consonant) without any deletion — however, it’s good enough

    > for Language Log!

    > http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3193

    Since a large number of English people (not Scots) from Nottinghamshire
    northwards pronounce the G in -ing and -inger, it really is dropping a
    consonant if they say -in. True, they are changing the value of the n as
    well, but not instead.

    There are three separate sounds: /In/ – /IN/ – /INg/


    Robert Bannister